Radiogram (device)

For other uses, see Radiogram (disambiguation).

Braun Table Radiogram, Model SK5, c 1962

Granada Radiogram, c 1960s

In British English, a radiogram is piece of furniture that combined a radio and record player.[1] The word radiogram is a portmanteau of radio and gramophone.[2] The corresponding term in American English is console.
Radiograms reached their peak of popularity in the post-war era, supported by a rapidly growing interest in records. Originally they were made of polished wood to blend with the furniture of the 1930s, with many styled by the leading designers of the day. An expensive instrument of entertainment for the house, fitted with a larger loudspeaker than the domestic radio, the radiogram soon began to develop features such as the record autochanger, which would accept six or seven records and play them one after another. Certain recordings could be ordered as a box set which would combine the recorded piece in order, to suit an autochanger set-up. In the 1940s and 1950s, sales of the radiogram, coupled with the then-new F.M. waveband, and the advent of the 45 rpm single and the LP record, meant that many manufacturers considered the radiogram to be more important than the fledgling television set sales. Later models took on the modern lines, piano gloss finish and plastic and gilt trim of the 1960s. Stereogram versions became available to take advantage of stereo records.
As valve radio development ended in the late 1960s and transistors began to take over, radiograms started to become obsolete. By the late 1970s, they had been replaced by more compact equipment, such as the hi-fi and the music centre.[citation needed]
Since radiograms were manufactured in such huge numbers they are not as rare or valuable as TV sets or table radios from the same period. An exception to this are models from certain manufacturers which have become collectable such as Hacker Radio Ltd., Dynatron, Blaupunkt, Braun, and SABA.
References[edit]

^ Collins Essential English Dictionary 2nd Edition (2006). “Radiogram definition”. Collins Essential English Dictionary 2nd Edition. HarperCollins Publishers. Retrieved 2009-05-17. 
^ “Radiogram definition”. Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary. 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-17. 

External links[edit]

Braun Table Radiogram, 1962 At the Object Wiki, Science Museum, London
Hacker Radio Ltd., Maidenhead manufacturer at Radiomuseum.org

The Story of Personal Electronics

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (June 2013) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

The Story of Personal Electronics

Studio album by Personal Electronics

Released
May 26, 1998

Genre
Electronic

Length
70:45

Label
LOHD

Producer
Brad Laner

Brad Laner chronology

Studio City
(1998)
The Story of Personal Electronics
(1998)
Lingus
(1998)

The Story of Personal Electronics is an album by Personal Electronics, released on August 8, 1995 through LOHD. It is the only album Brad Laner released under the moniker. John Payne of the LA Weekly described the music as “nerve-racking”, noting that “Laner’s getting more immersed in the newer music technology, while exploring the benefits of simplicity.”[1]
Track listing[edit]
All tracks written by Brad Laner.

No.
Title
Length

1.
“[untitled]”
0:41

2.
“[untitled]”
1:10

3.
“[untitled]”
6:32

4.
“[untitled]”
3:24

5.
“[untitled]”
2:57

6.
“[untitled]”
3:50

7.
“[untitled]”
3:14

8.
“[untitled]”
1:42

9.
“[untitled]”
1:20

10.
“[untitled]”
3:51

11.
“[untitled]”
0:58

12.
“[untitled]”
0:24

13.
“[untitled]”
0:21

14.
“[untitled]”
0:10

15.
“[untitled]”
1:42

16.
“[untitled]”
0:11

17.
“[untitled]”
1:02

18.
“[untitled]”
1:24

19.
“[untitled]”
0:35

20.
“[untitled]”
0:51

21.
“[untitled]”
1:17

22.
“[untitled]”
1:02

23.
“[untitled]”
30:21

24.
“[untitled]”
1:41

Personnel[edit]

Brad Laner – instruments, production

References[edit]

^ Payne, John (November 25, 1998). “Personal Electronics”. LA Weekly. Retrieved June 16, 2013. 

v
t
e

Brad Laner

Studio albums

Neighbor Singing
Natural Selections

as Electric Company

Studio albums

A Pert Cyclic Omen
Studio City
Omakase
Exitos
Slow Food
It’s Hard to Be a Baby
Creative Playthings

EPs

62-56

Remix albums

Electric Company Plays Amnesia
Greatest Hits

as Amnesia

Cherry Flavor Night Time
Lingus

as Personal Electronics

Story of Personal Electronics

Savage Republic

Jamahiriya Democratique et Populaire de Sauvage
Customs

Medicine

Shot Forth Self Living
The Buried Life
Her Highness
The Mechanical Forces of Love
To the Happy Few
Home Everywhere

Lusk

Free Mars

with Vas Deferens Organization

Transcontinental Conspiracy
More Pelvis Wick f

St Enoch subway station

St Enoch

Location
St. Enoch Square, Glasgow
Scotland

Coordinates
55°51′25″N 4°15′21″W / 55.85694°N 4.25583°W / 55.85694; -4.25583Coordinates: 55°51′25″N 4°15′21″W / 55.85694°N 4.25583°W / 55.85694; -4.25583

Operated by
SPT

Platforms
2

Connections
Glasgow Central
Argyle Street

Construction

Structure type
underground

Other information

Fare zone
G

Traffic

Passengers
1.796 [1] million annually enter/exit

St Enoch subway station is the first station on the north of the River Clyde on the Glasgow Subway. It is located in Glasgow city centre, Scotland. Although it does not have direct interchange with the main line railway, it is located approximately halfway between Glasgow Central station and Argyle Street railway station, within a few minutes’ walk to both. The station itself is accessible via St Enoch Square.
Usage of the entire subway in 2007/08 was 14.45 million passengers, increased from 13.14 million in 2005/06.[2]

Contents

1 The original building
2 The new building
3 Refurbishment (2010s)
4 References

The original building[edit]

Old-style (pre-2010s) St Enoch station entrance

Above ground, the original station building housed both a booking office and the headquarters of the original Glasgow District Subway Railway Company. This was (and is) the Subway’s most distinctive building – an ornate, Jacobean, late Victorian red sandstone structure; designed by James Miller in 1896. It still stands – it was carefully preserved during the modernisation of the Subway in 1977, even being jacked up in the air for a while, during reconstruction of the subsurface platforms.
The building was no longer used as a ticket office following the 1977-1980 modernisation; it became a travel information centre by SPT. The building became disused with the Travel Centre facilities being moved to the underground ticket hall in 2008. In December 2009, a Caffè Nero coffee shop was established in the building. It is now protected as a category A listed building.[3]
The new building[edit]

The former Subway station (now converted into a café), with the St Enoch Centre in the background.

The station is now entered through a pair of canopies, one on each side, and other than Buchanan Street, is the only station to feature a subterranean ticket hall. The station originally featured a single island platform, though this was replaced by a dual side platform layout during the modernisation pr
오피와우

Automatic number announcement circuit

An automatic number announcement circuit (ANAC) is a component of a central office of a telephone company that provides a service to installation and service technicians to determine the telephone number of a line. The facility has a telephone number that may be called to listen to an automatic announcement that includes the caller’s telephone number.
The ANAC number is useful primarily during the installation of landline telephones to quickly identify one of multiple lines.

Contents

1 Operation

1.1 958 local test exchanges
1.2 Tollfree numbers

2 ANAC numbers

2.1 United States
2.2 US toll-free
2.3 Canada
2.4 United Kingdom
2.5 Ireland
2.6 Israel
2.7 Australia
2.8 New Zealand
2.9 South Africa

3 See also
4 References

Operation[edit]
A technician calls the local telephone number of the automatic number announcement service. This call is connected to equipment at a local central office that uses a voice synthesizer or digital samples to announce the telephone number of the line calling in. The main purpose of this system is to allow telephone company technicians to identify the telephone line they are connected to.
Automatic number announcement systems are based on automatic number identification, and meant for phone company technicians, the ANAC system works with unlisted numbers, numbers with caller ID blocking, and numbers with no outgoing calls allowed. Installers of multi-line business services where outgoing calls from all lines display the company’s main number on call display can use ANAC to identify a specific line in the system, even if CID displays every line as “line one”.
Some ANACs are very regional or local in scope, while others are state-/province- or area-code-wide: there appears to be no consistent national system for them. Most are provider-specific. Every telephone company, whether large or small, determines its own ANAC for each individual central office, which tends to perpetuate the current situation of a mess of overlapping and/or spotty areas of coverage.[1] No official lists of ANAC numbers are published as telephone companies believe overuse of these numbers could make them more likely to be busy when needed by installers.[2]
958 local test exchanges[edit]
Under the North American Numbering Plan, almost all North American area codes reserve telephone numbers beginning with 958 and 959 for internal local and long distance testing (respectively), sometimes called plant testing. (One exception is Winnipeg, which reserves
연예인야동

Carlos Rúa

Carlos Rúa

Personal information

Full name
Carlos Andrés Rúa Flores

Date of birth
(1992-05-21) 21 May 1992 (age 24)

Height
1.75 m (5 ft 9 in)

Playing position
Midfielder

Club information

Current team

Llaneros F.C.

Senior career*

Years
Team
Apps
(Gls)

2012
Spartaks Jūrmala
29
(6)

2012
Salyut Belgorod
13
(0)

2013
Spartak Nalchik
33
(5)

2014–
Llaneros
4
(2)

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 17:46, 27 January 2014 (UTC).

Carlos Andrés Rúa Flores (born May 21, 1992) is a Colombian football midfielder who currently plays for Llaneros F.C..
References[edit]

External links[edit]

profile on sportbox.ru
Carlos Rúa profile at Soccerway

This biographical article related to Colombian football is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

v
t
e

수원오피